Define Test Levels (Proficiency)

Define Levels of Proficiency (Test Levels) in SchoolFront

In addition to tracking test scores, SchoolFront allows you to define test levels of proficiency. Each level of proficiency represents a range of test scores.

The most commonly used levels of proficiency in high school in the United States are A, B, C, D, F. Where an A-score may include test scores from 100 to 90 and mean "extremely proficient," a B-score may include test scores from 89 to 80 and might mean "proficient,/average," a C-score may include test scores from 79 to 70 and might mean "moderately proficient," a D-score may include test scores from 69 to 60 and might mean "under proficient," and an F-score may include scores from 50 to 0 and might mean "not proficient at all."

Levels of proficiency can be as complex or as simple as a school requires. For example you could break an English Language exam into the following score parts:

Score Title Score Description
English Language Composite Score Average of Sub-scores
  • Sub-Score: Speaking
A score from 1 to 4: Each question is worth between 1 and 4 points. This sub-score is the average score of the question scores in this category.
  • Sub-Score: Reading
A score from 1 to 4: Each question is worth between 1 and 4 points. This sub-score is the average score of the question scores in this category.
  • Sub-Score: Writing
A score from 1 to 4: Each question is worth between 1 and 4 points. This sub-score is the average score of the question scores in this category.


You could then define proficiency levels for the the test as follows:

Level Name Level Description
1 Student meets New York State standards with distinction.
2 Student meets New York State standards.
3 Student does not fully meet New York State standards.
4 Student does not meet New York State standards.


You would then have an overall composite test score for the student in English Language and associated overall-proficiency level, as well as the sub-scores used to calculate the composite score and their associated levels of proficiency.

Test levels do not have to be alpha-numerical characters. They can be words like "Pass" and "Fail." For example:

Level Name Level Description
Pass The student has demonstrated the level of proficiency required to pass the overall test or a portion of the overall test.
Fail The student has demonstrated the level of proficiency required to pass the overall test or a portion of the overall test.


 Or here's another example:

Level Name Level Description
Bench Benchmark Achieved: Student has a 50% chance of obtaining a B or higher or about a 75% chance of obtaining a C or higher in the corresponding first-year college course.
Not Bench Benchmark Not Achieved: Student success in the corresponding first-year college course is not predictable. Research shows that of students who took the ACT more than once 57% increased their Composite score, 21% had no change in their Composite score, and 22% decreased their Composite score.


Test scoring can be configured as granularly as necessary to determine where students are excelling and where they are struggling across subject areas and within subject areas.


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